1996 Hong Tai Chang Ripe Pu-erh Tea Cake

Origin: Thailand
Harvest: 1996
Elevation: 1300 m
Trees' age: 200-500 y.o.
Availability: In Stock
$5.00
-+
Reward Points on purchase: 2 Details

A unique aged shu pu-erh from an old Thai factory that makes tea according to the traditions of the famous brand Hong Tai Chang. The material from trees aged 200-500 years. By the way, a real HTC cannot be plantation tea, there are no Assamica plantations in Thailand.

The pressing is soft, the cake is easy to disassemble without a knife.

The taste is soft and smooth. Sweet woody and nutty tones are followed by a light chocolate bitterness of classic aged Shu or Lui Bao. This is the case when a truly wise and powerful old tea is hidden under the unsightly wrapper.

Please, pay attention.

Hong Tai Chang is one of the most frequently forged tea brands. It was very famous in its time... On Aliexpress and Taobao, you can find young tea under various covers of Hong Tai Chan. The description usually says it was produced in Yunnan. It can not be true.

The fact is, that even the brand is from Yunnan, it had been producing its tea from Thai trees and in Thailand. Yunnan material was used only at the very beginning, in the 30s, and then it was completely replaced with Thai one from old trees. Yunnan trademark and its office in Yibang was closed in 1949.

Only Thai tea manufactured under the brand Hong Tai Chang carries the spirit of that era, thanks to the original varieties of old trees and transmitted traditions.

Reviews (2)

The description on this tea is spot on - the soft chocolate background, the gentle nutty tones, the smoothness.

It’s definitely old trees as it brews forever (>20), has a deep and complex taste, and the qi is overpowering, to the point of being too much.

It’s definitely a high quality aged shou that is more than worth a try.

The only cons are the (justifiably) steep price, and that the taste might be a little too subtle to some.

When I look at the tea the 1st time, I decided to have it boiled Lu Yu style.
I revived the tea by firing it on my incense burner for about 10 minutes and let it rest for about 30 minutes before boiling it in my hong ni.
I added hot water into the pot to was twice and then Slow boiling over fire (Candle) for a some time before drinking it
The result is a thick concoction of Shou PuErh with scarlet tone instead of pitch black.
Upper notes of Malt, ripe and aged dried fruit such as dried plum.
Middle tone of black sugar and herbal roots like sweetness.
Undertone of wood that resembles moist teak wood, and when boiling the aroma is sort of similar to a burning aromatic wood (not agar or sandalwood, but aromatic - perhaps cedar).

Write a review

Note: HTML is not translated!
    Bad           Good
Related Products
TEA SIDE © 2012-2019